Posts Tagged ‘unity’

GAMING: Half Hour Games – Viridi

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This is the start of our Half Hour Games column, a series where we experience free games within the span of half an hour and then tell you about them. Call it “judging a book by its cover” because it’s certainly not representative, but for the millennial world, we need all the time that we can get.

Viridi is a free-to-play indie simulator game, designed by Ice Water Games (the game studio also responsible for Eidolon) and released for Steam on August 20, 2015.
Viridi is marketed as a brief lunch-break game to be “a place you can return to for a moment of peace and quiet whenever you need it”. The game revolves around growing and maintaining your personal pot of succulent plants and keeping them watered and alive. That’s it – you get a pot of plants, and you treat it pretty much like a real pot of plants. No goals, no gameplay, no stress. It’s just you and your cacti, relaxing.

It sounds interesting in practice – a quiet, comfortable place to watch little plant buddies chill out? It’s certainly a Far Cry from all of the Call of Fallout Battlefield games out there. But is it really substantial enough for it to hold its own? After the jump, we’ll give this game 30 minutes to impress us or wither trying.

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GAMING: Naut

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Alone, on the surface of Mars, the only thing that you have to keep you company is the sound of your car’s engine. You don’t know how long it’s been since you’ve seen another person, but you are certain the ghostly inhabitants of each house you find offer you no help in your journey. Each time you crash into a mysteriously appearing rock, it only highlights your loneliness – oh great, you’ve fallen through the floor again…

Naut is a 2014 game created in Unity by the French game collective Klondike. It was produced specifically by three of the collective’s members: Lucie Viatgé, who did the game’s visuals and animation; Tom Victor, who programmed and did tech art; and Titouan Millet, who did music and additional coding.

After the jump, we explore the existential crises of Mars as viewed through the windshield of a convertible car.

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