Posts Tagged ‘pc’

GAMING: Hylics

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Hylics is a JRPG-style game made by Mason Lindroth and released on August 29, 2015.

The concept of “hylics” is taken from Greek gnosticism, where it was the basest portion of what made up a living person: their physical body. This was the evil portion of a person, the part of them that demanded to eat, to have sex, to do anything that would keep a person away from perfect spiritual enlightenment. Hylics doesn’t portray itself as an evil game, but it is an intimately physical one where the entire world is molded out of malleable, changeable clay.

After the jump, we’ll sculpt our opinion out.

Read On…

GAMING: Half Hour Games – Oases

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Oases is a game released on November 11, 2015. Described as a “kaleidoscopic elegiac flyscape”, it was created by Armel Gibson and dziff, members of the Klondike Collective. You might remember the Klondike Collective from their last work that we reviewed, Naut. This game has a lot of similarities to Naut: it’s a surreal, brightly colored jaunt throughout a mysterious, desolate landscape. The main difference is that this one takes place in an airplane. Oh, and also it’s scary.

We had discovered Oases over Twitter, where some small discussion of it had sprouted from its release. We were interested and decided to give it a look, as we had heard that it was “relaxing” and “soothing”. We’re always in the market for more games to soothe us, so we thought at first Oases and us would be a perfect match. But would it? After the jump, we’ll hop in the cockpit and find out.

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GAMING: Naut

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Alone, on the surface of Mars, the only thing that you have to keep you company is the sound of your car’s engine. You don’t know how long it’s been since you’ve seen another person, but you are certain the ghostly inhabitants of each house you find offer you no help in your journey. Each time you crash into a mysteriously appearing rock, it only highlights your loneliness – oh great, you’ve fallen through the floor again…

Naut is a 2014 game created in Unity by the French game collective Klondike. It was produced specifically by three of the collective’s members: Lucie Viatgé, who did the game’s visuals and animation; Tom Victor, who programmed and did tech art; and Titouan Millet, who did music and additional coding.

After the jump, we explore the existential crises of Mars as viewed through the windshield of a convertible car.

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RETRO: Taco Bell – Tasty Temple Challenge

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Hey kids! Do you like Taco Bell? Do you like Duke Nukem 3D? Of course you do? Well, what if I told you there was a way you could enjoy Taco Bell and Duke Nukem 3D at the same time Wait, did we do this already?

Taco Bell: Tasty Temple Challenge was an advergame given away with Taco Bell’s kids meal in 2000. Even for advergames, the concept is pretty inane: You play as “Baja Bill”, an adventurer exploring deep into a lost jungle temple to find an imprisoned Grande Meal. Yes, you’re on a quest to rescue precious Taco Bell food from an ancient faux Mayan-Incan-Aztec-Racist Caricature temple. As you battle your way through the temple, you combat snakes and scorpions by… lighting them on fire?

After the jump, we’ll explore the Tasty Temple, discover its secrets, and figure out how some free games demand their own kind of payment.

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RETRO: Chex Quest

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Hey, kids! Do you like Chex Cereal? Do you like DOOM? Of course you do! Well, what if I told you there was a way you could enjoy Chex and DOOM at the same time? No, no I’m serious – wait – no, don’t leave – hold on –

Chex Quest was an unusual entity in the world of video games, namely because it was one of the few games ever used to promote a brand of breakfast cereal. Released in 1996, it was packaged in with boxes of Chex for free and given nationwide distribution. It’s doubly unusual because the game in question is a commercially sold DOOM mod – a total conversion of the first DOOM game, completely done over with new graphics, sounds, and gameplay.

A second Chex Quest game was made hot on the heels of the first one, but promises of a third never realized. Although fans made plenty of mods to fill in the gap, it wasn’t until 2008 when Charles Jacobi, one of the lead artists on the original Chex Quest, made his own official Chex Quest 3 with the first two games bundled in.

Get out your bootspoons, because after the jump we’ll dig right in and discuss the history, gameplay, and our thoughts about all three games.

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RETRO: Sonic’s Schoolhouse

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Why the hell did they decide to make Sonic the Hedgehog the star of an educational game for children? Who allowed this to happen? We want names. Who, somewhere in the leadership of Sega, let this happen? Who?

In the mid-1990s, Sonic the Hedgehog was one of the hottest video game characters out there. His too-cool attitude and the blisteringly fast gameplay of his games made him the slick alternative to the stuffy Mario. And with how popular he was, this meant there was a bounty of Sonic the Hedgehog branded everything: Sonic the Hedgehog toys, Sonic the Hedgehog comics, Sonic the Hedgehog cartoons, Sonic the Hedgehog canned pasta… The list goes on. It only makes sense that Sega would want a Sonic the Hedgehog game for elementary schoolers, right?

In comes Sonic’s Schoolhouse, a tale of bad branding decisions and corporate failure. Read On…

GAMING: The Uncle Who Works For Nintendo

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The Uncle Who Works For Nintendo is a text-based horror game, created by writer Michael Lutz and artist Kimberly Parker. Released on October 15, 2014 to minor fanfare and coverage on websites like Kotaku, it tells a poignant horror story about growing up in the 1990s and the violence that people who love games commit upon each other.

Video games are one of the archetypical boys’ clubs amongst boys’ clubs. The exclusion of women, people of color, queer people, and any combination of the former has been a long ingrained problem within the community. And frequently, these minority people are pitted against each other to prove who is the “truest” fan of video games. Any woman who has even a passing interest in gaming will be familiar with the threat of not being considered a “true gamer”. Women are constantly being forced to prove the simple reality that they consume video games like their male peers.

When women are forced to constantly prove their love of games, it frequently forces them to start questioning other women’s credentials about video games. Women who proclaim themselves to be “not like other girls” and as “one of the boys” frequently exhibit a deep internalized misogyny, thinking that they are better than other women for having somehow successfully proven how much like a man they are. When women start fighting with other women on who gets to play video games, the only winners are the men who dictate them to fight against each other for their approval.

The Uncle Who Works For Nintendo is about this kind of in-fighting. Read On…