Posts Tagged ‘2014’

GAMING: Job Lozenge

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Job Lozenge is a lo-fi employment simulator released on December 8, 2014 by Taylor Bai-Woo.

Congratulation! You have been hired for the position of CRATE DISPLACER. Due to the large influx of CRATES in the LOCATION, the job of CRATE DISPLACER has become essential. Work hard at your job and do not leave the premisessssseSmOÛ0þ¼þŠ[¤M‚˜ò*×[¡D P±L÷Ú˜%v°X÷ëwNÃËF$çìóÝã»çîøûéõYv;ŸÁEv™ÂüÇišœA´ÃX2˾16ͦ››½x—±ÙU$<œƒ˜M¦$²$Kgâï[tfÖËÙSTRING ERROR

After the jump, we’¼ç׎·¶ur opinion on Job Lozenge FATAL ERROR

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GAMING: Half Hour Games – Frail Shells

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Frail Shells is a first-person shooter made by Taylor Bai-Woo with music by Ryan Roth. It was released November 15, 2014 as part of the 7DFPS Jam, a collaborative game design event dedicated to making a first-person shooter in seven days.

War is hell. War has changed. War never changes. War! What is it good for? There’s a lot to be said about a good war. There is a lot to be said about a bad war, as well.

Since the world has an enormous fascination with watching people kill each other, games about war are just as prominent as real wars. Frail Shells is a game about war, but it’s not like other war games. It’s about a much more personal kind of war.

After the jump, we’ll land boots first into our review.

Note: Frail Shells is a game that’s difficult to talk about without spoiling the twist. The rest of this review contains spoilers.

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GAMING: Half Hour Games – Expat

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Expat is a game released on June 2, 2014 by Blendo Games for the Space Cowboy Game Jam, a collaborative game design event inspired by Cowboy Bebop with the theme of combining both the American and final frontiers.

We’re always excited to play games by Blendo, as they always have a massive amount of charm that we feel represents the best qualities of the independent game market. Expat is no exception, as it’s a game about a real rough-rockin’ hombre out to earn a little extra scratch with one of the oldest professions in the world: knocking troublemakers on their heads and turning them in for cash. Fly across the solar system and make friends, hunt enemies, and get wads of cash or die trying.

After the jump, we’ll blast off after the most valuable bounty of all: a game review.

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GAMING: Twilight Sparkle’s Secret Shipfic Folder [Postmortem]

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Twilight Sparkle’s Secret Shipfic Folder was a fan-made My Little Pony card game, released in Summer of 2014. It is also, for all intents and purposes, not the normal kind of thing that we would review on Efemerovo.

We here at Eggware.XYZ have something we must admit: we enjoy My Little Pony. We’ve enjoyed it for a long time, since our childhoods. We have enjoyed the latest series, My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, since its inception. It is a good television show and an excellent franchise, one that hits all the right notes for its target market of young girls and people well outside it.

It’s not just little girls who love My Little Pony, though. They are those who call themselves “Bronies”. Adults, typically men, have flocked to the 2010 My Little Pony reboot in droves, and they brought a lot of their adult concepts with them. This has been a problematic development for a lot of the young fans of My Little Pony, as the primary resources for My Little Pony content are primarily made by adults, for adults.

Twilight Sparkle’s Secret Shipfic Folder was not for My Little Pony‘s target audience. So who was it for, really? After the jump, we’ll explore this game postmortem and delve into some of its more “adult” choices.

Warning: This article is much more mature than the content usually featured on Efemerovo. We discuss a multitude of topics, including sexuality, consent, and incest (uh, yeah, it gets weird). Use discretion and do not view if you are uncomfortable with the subject matter.

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GAMING: Naut

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Alone, on the surface of Mars, the only thing that you have to keep you company is the sound of your car’s engine. You don’t know how long it’s been since you’ve seen another person, but you are certain the ghostly inhabitants of each house you find offer you no help in your journey. Each time you crash into a mysteriously appearing rock, it only highlights your loneliness – oh great, you’ve fallen through the floor again…

Naut is a 2014 game created in Unity by the French game collective Klondike. It was produced specifically by three of the collective’s members: Lucie Viatgé, who did the game’s visuals and animation; Tom Victor, who programmed and did tech art; and Titouan Millet, who did music and additional coding.

After the jump, we explore the existential crises of Mars as viewed through the windshield of a convertible car.

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GAMING: The Uncle Who Works For Nintendo

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The Uncle Who Works For Nintendo is a text-based horror game, created by writer Michael Lutz and artist Kimberly Parker. Released on October 15, 2014 to minor fanfare and coverage on websites like Kotaku, it tells a poignant horror story about growing up in the 1990s and the violence that people who love games commit upon each other.

Video games are one of the archetypical boys’ clubs amongst boys’ clubs. The exclusion of women, people of color, queer people, and any combination of the former has been a long ingrained problem within the community. And frequently, these minority people are pitted against each other to prove who is the “truest” fan of video games. Any woman who has even a passing interest in gaming will be familiar with the threat of not being considered a “true gamer”. Women are constantly being forced to prove the simple reality that they consume video games like their male peers.

When women are forced to constantly prove their love of games, it frequently forces them to start questioning other women’s credentials about video games. Women who proclaim themselves to be “not like other girls” and as “one of the boys” frequently exhibit a deep internalized misogyny, thinking that they are better than other women for having somehow successfully proven how much like a man they are. When women start fighting with other women on who gets to play video games, the only winners are the men who dictate them to fight against each other for their approval.

The Uncle Who Works For Nintendo is about this kind of in-fighting. Read On…