TUTORIAL: Blender 2.8 – Vertex Colors

It would be a shorter list to say the things that Blender 2.8 didn’t change. All of these changes have been great for professional users, but they’ve certainly alienated Blender’s long-term hobbyist userbase. As an amateur professional, I’m hoping to help bridge that gap.

So I talked about how to make a shadeless material. But how do you apply vertex colors to that material?

Vertex colors, as the name implies, are RGB data that is stored in individual vertices. These days, vertex colors are treated as irrelevant, but they have a ton of uses if you’re willing to play with it. You can use them to make completely textureless models with basic flat colors, which is great if you don’t care much for mucking with UVs. Another thing you can do is use them for shading your textured model, which is a great way to keep the file size down on low-resolution textures.

Vertex colors are great for all kinds of retro and minimalist styles, and the data in them can easily be ported to game engines like Godot. Also, it’s just plain fun to mess with and will teach you more about the Shader Editor. So let’s go!

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TUTORIALS: Blender 2.8 – Shadeless Material

It would be a shorter list to say the things that Blender 2.8 didn’t change. All of these changes have been great for professional users, but they’ve certainly alienated Blender’s long-term hobbyist userbase. As an amateur professional, I’m hoping to help bridge that gap.

It’s a surprisingly popular question with a surprisingly complicated answer: how do you get a Shadeless material in Blender 2.8?

Shadeless materials accept no lighting information, meaning they will always be the same color in any lighting environment. They have tons of uses, especially for low-poly art and toon shaders. And they used to be so, so easy: as recently as Blender 2.79, you could achieve it with a single button press.

Obviously this wouldn’t even be an article if that button was still around. So how do you do it now?

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